Saturday, May 23, 2020

Family Function - 1586 Words

The definition of family is defined in various ways to many different people. Many people may say their family includes the family of orientation, extended family, and family of procreation. It all depends on how the child is raised. Three important factors, out of six, that I consider to be the main functions of family are socialization, economic cooperation, and care, protection, and intimacy. Some families may very well address these functions, while others may not. And because of that, family may be quite hard to define because it goes above and beyond the surface. According to Swartz and Scott (2009), family is defined as a group of people related to each other by blood, marriage, adoption or being sexually open in a relationship. The†¦show more content†¦I was on my best behavior. And there was no such thing as always being happy like I was when I am at home with my parents. I learned what it was like to be picked on, be mad, angry, happy, and develop friendships. I think my family addressed this function well, because I have matured to be able to communicate and socialize with all those around me, which includes how to act and feel. Economic cooperation involves a family’s responsibility to provide for everyone’s physical and economic well being (Swartz amp; Scott, 2009). In history, families work in the field, as agriculturists and farmers to provide food. They also sold products that were farmed to provide money, shelter, and clothes. However, it is different nowadays. Now, both or either men and or women go to work to receive an income to help provide for their families. When I was younger, my mom stayed home and worked at home and earned little income, while my dad worked at a factory and earned most of the income. But as our family grew, and the children got older, there were certain necessities needed such as bigger clothes, shoes, more food, and a bigger home. Therefore, my mom had to find a different job with a higher pay. Both of my parents did work and still work to provide most of the income for our family. When I got older and turned the legal age to work full time, I helped provide my parents the income in the family to help pay for small bills such as electricity,Show MoreRelatedFamily Systems Theory And Function Within The Family System Essay967 Words   |  4 PagesFamily is a very complex term that can be defined in many ways. A family can be simply defined as a group of people who are related to each other and live together in the same household. According to the American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences (2004, p. 5), a fam ily is defined as two or more persons who share resources, share responsibility for decisions, share values and goals, and have a commitment to one another over time. The two definitions that were presented clarified the vastRead MoreDiverse Family Structures and Functions in Britain Essay753 Words   |  4 PagesDiverse Family Structures and Functions When British people today think of a family they think of a father, a mother and two children. This is the stereotype of the family, which is called Nuclear Family. In fact, there are many other family structures such as, Extended Family, Linear Family, Single-parent Family, etc. This essay will look at a range of diverse family structures and functions in Britain today, especially the four kind of family structure: NuclearRead MoreFunctions and Diversity of Family Structure in the UK Essay1276 Words   |  6 PagesFunctions and Diversity of Family Structure There are various debates and views on the term ‘family’ in today’s society. Although we can say that a family consists of a unit of people that are related, either legally through marriage or biologically. In both premodern and modern societies families have been seen as the most basic unit of a social organisation that carries out vital tasks, such as socialising children. Whereas a ‘household’ consists of a groupRead MoreFamily Functions and Structures in Britain Today Essay660 Words   |  3 PagesFamily Functions and Structures in Britain Today What is a family? A family is a group of people who are related by kinship ties: relations of blood, marriage or adoption. The family unit is one of the most important social institutions, which is found in some form in nearly all known societies. It is basic unit of social organisation and plays a key role in socialising children into the culture of their society. HobartC 1999 the group of people, generally relatedRead MoreOutline Discuss the Function of Families in Contemporary Uk Society1512 Words   |  7 PagesOutline discuss the function of families in contemporary UK society The definition of the term ‘family’ has somewhat gone through radical changes over the past few decades in the UK, some 30 years ago a family was defined as being father, mother and children. Some referred to this as the â€Å"cereal box family† as this was typically the type of family to be shown on television commercials for cereal. This stereotype is more correctly known as the nuclear family, however changes over the years hasRead MoreFamily s Roles And Functions, Childcare Practices, And Emotional Dynamics1673 Words   |  7 PagesAmerican family life has gone through extensive transformations. Just over the past three centuries there has been overwhelming changes in family’s roles and functions, childcare practices, and emotional dynamics. The definition of what is considered to be â€Å"family† has changed due to shifts in social values, the economy, and health. Therefore, there isn’t a set definition for the â€Å"traditional familyà ¢â‚¬  because family life is a social and cultural construct. Before the industrial era, family life wasRead MoreFunctions of the Family1380 Words   |  6 PagesAssess the view that in today’s society the family is losing its functions. For many years, the family has had a set of functions that every family has had to follow in order to fit in with society. Some of these functions include social control and the gender-role socialisation. Some Sociologists that have explored these functions are Murdock and Parsons. Murdock looks at reproductive, sexual and economic functions. Whereas, Parsons looks at the primary socialisation of children and the warm bathRead MoreChanging Structure and Function of Family: a Study of Indian Society3979 Words   |  16 PagesPROJECT-SOCIOLOGY CHANGING STRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONS OF FAMILY: A STUDY OF INDIAN SOCIETY Submitted by Prarthna Table of Contents * Acknowledgements†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Read MoreAssess the view that the family performs vital, positive functions for society and individual members.1398 Words   |  6 PagesThe family was once described as a social group that shared common residence, consisted of at least two adults of each sex that maintained a socially approved sexual relationship and had one or more children, their own or adopted. This is a nuclear family, described by George Murdoch to be a universal family type. Although it is correct to say that nuclear families reside universally, family types now vary from single-parent families to gay headed families. Despite the variety, they contribute toRead MoreSocioeconomic Status And Family Function1543 Words   |  7 PagesThe factor of socioeconomic status and family function greatly influences the development of a child, both psychological ly and educationally. What I found intriguing about a family’s SES is its effect on the family’s value base, functioning, and the upbringing of their children. The SES â€Å"combines three related, but not completely overlapping, variables: (1) years of education and (2) the prestige of one’s job and the skill it requires, both of which measure social status; and (3) income, which measures

Monday, May 18, 2020

Postmodern Art and Artificial Environment Essay - 640 Words

During the 1960s and 1970s, artists were interested in rejecting the Modernist obsession with the aesthetic and began by questioning the formal qualities tied to this aesthetic .The goal of art in the post-modern standard is no longer predominantly behavioral, as it still was in the modern, but perceptive. The post-modern is the art of the artificial environment. Artists favored the readymade object as more powerful than the supposedly new crafted objects produced by Modernist artists. By willingly allowing the practice of appropriation that occurs within the production of all art, these artists pulled the power of pre-existing imagery and signs to produce â€Å"new† works with multiple layers and multiple meanings. In order to perceive the†¦show more content†¦He reduced art to a few basic shapes (quadrilaterals, spheres, triangles), colors (red, yellow, blue, black) and types of lines and much of what he devised came in the form of drawings and instructions or acti ons that could be carried out by someone other than himself. He believed that the input of others including their joy, boredom, frustration or whatever; remained part of the art that he designed. Now people become more original and they were able to show their character in their own and individual way. Artists during this period were more pessimistic and did not see the world necessarily improving in the future. People no longer just look for beauty or perfection, they found a way to look past that and even if it is one-sided people began to appreciate art in an aesthetic point of view. I feel that in this day and age people lack the initiative to experiment and be daring to take risks; by pushing boundaries and by not playing safe we could create something different. In One and Three Chairs, the chair is what made his art. Joseph Kosuth represents one chair three ways: as a mass-produced chair, as a photograph, and as a copy of a dictionary record for the word â€Å"chair.† The connection is therefore composed of an object, an image, and words. Kosuth is interested in demonstrating three distinct ways objects, pictures, and words that will all represent the basic fact of the chair. He pushes the audience to think about how these three modes communicateShow MoreRelatedJean Baudrillard : An Influential Thinker1379 Words   |  6 PagesIn 2007, Jean Baudrillard was published in a Canadian Newspaper, La Presse. Jean Baudrillard (1929-2007), French sociologist and philosopher, is one of the most influential postmodern thinkers, known for his scathing critic on consumerism or late capitalism, which he prophesied. In 1970, he published The Consumer Society, which he shed light on the subject and object of consumption, around which contemporary societies are organized. A few years later, he published Simulacra and Simulation, andRead MoreThe Guggenheim Museum Bilbao Museum978 Words   |  4 Pagesvariations of the neoclassical style. But, the Guggenheim museum in Bilbao moved the heading of gallery outlines, which gave an extensive show venue to twentieth century and modern art, designed by the famous architect Frank Gehry. Architecture is important nowadays to the public, because it offers a physical surrounding environment in where we live in. Moreover, architecture is not only affected by the culture, but also by the economy of the country. Frank Gehry is one of the handful modern architectsRead MoreRemains of the Day as a Postmodern Novel5345 Words   |  22 PagesPostmodern literature has its many spokesmen. Many would agree that Kazuo Ishiguro is not the most typical representative of this somewhat anarchistic literary and social movement, but he is certainly one of its most subtle and valuable artists. He uses the principles of post modernistic writing in a very meaningful way, and only after a thorough analysis can one fully appreciate all carefully constructed and presented elements trough which he successfully delivers his story. Remains of the day,Read MoreEssay about The Remains of the Day by Kazuo Ishiguro5293 Words   |  22 PagesThe Remains of the Day by Kazuo Ishiguro Postmodern literature has its many spokesmen. Many would agree that Kazuo Ishiguro is not the most typical representative of this somewhat anarchistic literary and social movement, but he is certainly one of its most subtle and valuable artists. He uses the principles of post modernistic writing in a very meaningful way, and only after a thorough analysis can one fully appreciate all carefully constructed and presented elements trough which he successfullyRead MorePostmodernism and the Simpsons10775 Words   |  44 PagesMetanarratives Ritgerà ° til B.A.-prà ³fs Bjà ¶rn Erlingur Flà ³ki Bjà ¶rnsson bjornfloki@gmail.com Kt. 110982-5779 Maà ­ 2006 Abstract This essay offers a postmodernist reading of the popular television program The Simpsons, with special regard to the postmodern theories of intertexuality, hyperreality, and metanarratives. Before delving into The Simpsons, some major theoretical aspects of postmodernism in aesthetic production are outlined. Three of the most prominent theorists of postmodernism – LyotardRead MoreCall of the wild2057 Words   |  9 Pagesopposition is not relevant, because the term natural is an artificial and problematic concept. Respectively, the confrontation between civilization and culture is also artificial. Although we may find a propaganda of vegetarian diet and a healthy way of life in Snyders poems, he himself is not a vegetarian and not a Luddite (Weinberger). Snyder does not seem to divide his world view in dual categories, being aware these oppositions are artificial, but rather clings to a holistic position. The oppositionRead MorePost Modern Attributes of the de Young Museum: Essay2497 Words   |  10 Pagesdecision was made to retain certain features of the old de young Museum - the sphinxes, the pool of enchantment, the original tress and to incorporate them into the new design. Therefore a sense of nostalgia does exist in the buildings surrounding environment. What appeared promising about Herzog de Meuron was attributed to their Swiss background. Architectural critics endowed them with attributes commonly ascribed to Swiss architecture in the 20th century namely: efficiency, concern for qualityRead MoreThe Importance of Philosophy to Engineering8110 Words   |  33 Pagesthe paper will, however, make a more reflective effort to speculate about the deepening relations between engineering and philosophy in an increasingly engineered world. Engineers are, I will finally suggest, the unacknowledged philosophers of the postmodern world. 1. SELF-DEFENSE AND PHILOSOPHY Let me begin, then, with the issue of self-defense. As preface to this issue, consider an engineering-like schematic presentation of the problem. The problem is that engineering and philosophy are typicallyRead MoreThe Transcendent Dimension Of Ecology Essay1878 Words   |  8 PagesThe Hungry Tide Dr. R. Badhridevanath, Assist. Prof. English IQAC Coordinator, Vivekanandha College of Arts and Sciences for Women (Autnomous) Elayampalayam Tamilnadu bathridevanath@gmail.com Charles Godwin, Asst. Prof. of English, Akash Degree College, Bangalore. Charlesgodwin.k@gmail.com Ecocriticism is the study of the relationship between literature and the physical environment. The word ‘Eco’ and ‘Critic’ is derived from the Greek word ‘Oikos’ and ‘Kritic’. The relationship is thatRead MoreArchitecture Of The Finlandia Hall2195 Words   |  9 Pageshuman circulation to the way the door handles curve smoothly outwards to prevent sleeves from being caught when opening them. Also the interior use of granite was used to reflect nature s own subdued way rather than vivid colours and anything artificial that may distract attention from the main focus of the building being the audience and performers themselves. Again this is in keeping with Aalto s conviction that architecture serves as a background for human beings. The humanizing elements begins

Tuesday, May 12, 2020

John Paul Jones in the American Revolution

Scottish by birth, Commodore John Paul Jones became the new United States first naval hero during the  American Revolution (1775-1783). Beginning his career as a merchant sailor and, later, captain, he was forced to flee to the North American colonies after killing a member of his crew in self defense. In 1775, shortly after the war began, Jones was able to secure a commission as lieutenant in the fledgling Continental Navy. Taking part in its early campaigns, he excelled as a commerce raider when given independent commands. Given command of the sloop-of-war Ranger (18 guns) in 1777, Jones received the first foreign salute of the American flag and became the first Continental Navy officer to capture a British warship. In 1779, he repeated the feat when a squadron under his command captured HMS Serapis (44) and HMS Countess of Scarborough (22) at the Battle of Flamborough Head. With the end of the conflict, Jones later served as a rear admiral in the Imperial Russian Navy. Fast Facts: John Paul Jones Rank: Captain (US), Rear Admiral (Russia)Service: Continental Navy, Imperial Russian NavyBirth Name: John PaulBorn: July 6, 1747 at Kirkcudbright, ScotlandDied: July 18, 1792, Paris, FranceParents: John Paul, Sr. and Jean (McDuff) PaulConflicts: American RevolutionKnown For: Battle of Flamborough Head (1777) Early Life Born John Paul on July 6, 1747, at Kirkcudbright, Scotland, John Paul Jones was the son of a gardener. Going to sea at age 13, he first served aboard the merchant ship Friendship which operated out of Whitehaven. Progressing through the merchant ranks, he sailed on both trading vessels and slavers. A skilled sailor, he was made first mate of the slaver Two Friends in 1766. Though the slave trade was lucrative, Jones became disgusted with it and departed the vessel two years later. In 1768, while sailing as a mate aboard the brig John, Jones suddenly ascended to command after yellow fever killed the captain. Safely bringing the vessel back to port, the ships owners made him the permanent captain. In this role, Jones made several profitable voyages to the West Indies. Two years after taking command, Jones was forced to severely flog a disobedient sailor. His reputation suffered when the sailor died a few weeks later. Leaving John, Jones became captain of the London-based Betsey. While lying off Tobago in December 1773, trouble began with his crew and he was forced to kill one of them in self-defense. In the wake of this incident, he was advised to flee until an admiralty commission could be formed to hear his case. North America Traveling north to Fredericksburg, VA, Jones hoped to obtain aid from his brother who had settled in the area. Finding that his brother had died, he took over his affairs and estate. It was during this period that he added Jones to his name, possibly in an effort to distance himself from his past. Sources are unclear regarding his activities in Virginia, however it is known that he traveled to Philadelphia in the summer of 1775, to offer his services to the new Continental Navy after the start of the American Revolution. Endorsed by Richard Henry Lee, Jones was commissioned as the first lieutenant of the frigate Alfred (30) Continental Navy Fitting out in Philadelphia, Alfred was commanded by Commodore Esek Hopkins. On December 3, 1775, Jones became the first to hoist the US flag over an American warship. The following February, Alfred served as Hopkins flagship during the expedition against New Providence in the Bahamas. Landing marines on March 2, 1776, Hopkins force succeeded in capturing weapons and supplies which were badly needed by General George Washingtons army at Boston. Returning to New London, Jones was given command of the sloop Providence (12), with the temporary rank of captain, on May 10, 1776. While aboard Providence, Jones displayed his skill as a commerce raider capturing sixteen British ships during one six-week cruise and received his permanent promotion to captain. Arriving at Narragansett Bay on October 8, Hopkins appointed Jones to command Alfred. Through the fall, Jones cruised off Nova Scotia capturing several additional British vessels and securing winter uniforms and coal for the army. Putting into Boston on December 15, he began a major refit on the vessel. While in port, Jones, a poor politician, began feuding with Hopkins. As result, Jones was next assigned to command the new 18-gun sloop-of-war Ranger rather than one of the new frigates being built for the Continental Navy. Departing Portsmouth, NH on November 1, 1777, Jones was ordered to proceed to France to assist the American cause in any way possible. Arriving at Nantes on December 2, Jones met with Benjamin Franklin and informed the American commissioners of the victory at the Battle of Saratoga. On February 14, 1778, while in Quiberon Bay, Ranger received the first recognition of the American flag by a foreign government when it was saluted by the French fleet. Cruise of Ranger Sailing from Brest on April 11, Jones sought to bring the war home to the British people with the goal of forcing the Royal Navy to withdraw forces from American waters. Boldly sailing into the Irish Sea, he landed his men at Whitehaven on April 22 and spiked the guns in the towns fort as well as burned shipping in the harbor. Crossing Solway Firth, he landed at St. Marys Isle to kidnap the Earl of Selkirk whom he believed could be exchanged for American prisoners of war. Coming ashore, he found that the Earl was away. To placate the desires of his crew, he seized the familys set of silver plate. Crossing the Irish Sea, Ranger encountered the sloop-of-war HMS Drake (20) on April 24. Attacking, Ranger captured the ship after an hour-long battle. Drake became the first British warship to be captured by the Continental Navy. Returning to Brest, Jones was greeted as a hero. Promised a new, larger ship, Jones soon encountered problems with the American commissioners as well as the French admiralty. After some struggle, he obtained a former East Indiaman which he converted into a warship. Mounting 42 guns, Jones named the ship Bonhomme Richard in tribute to Benjamin Franklin. Battle of Flamborough Head Sailing on August 14, 1779, Jones commanded a five-ship squadron. Proceeding northwest, Jones moved up the west coast of Ireland and turned to circle the British Isles. While the squadron captured several merchant ships, Jones experienced persistent problems with insubordination from his captains. On September 23, Jones encountered a large British convoy off Flamborough Head escorted by HMS Serapis (44) and HMS Countess of Scarborough (22). Jones maneuvered Bonhomme Richard to engage Serapis while his other ships intercepted Countess of Scarborough. Though Bonhomme Richard was pounded by Serapis, Jones was able to close and lash the two ships together. In a prolonged and brutal fight, his men were able to overcome the British resistance and succeeded in capturing Serapis. It was during this fight that Jones reputedly replied to a British demand for surrender with Surrender? I have not yet begun to fight! As his men were achieving their victory, his consorts captured Countess of Scarborough. Turning for Texel, Jones was forced to abandon the battered Bonhomme Richard on September 25. America Again hailed as a hero in France, Jones was awarded the rank of Chevalier by King Louis XVI. On June 26, 1781, Jones was appointed to command America (74) which was then under construction at Portsmouth. Returning to America, Jones threw himself into the project. Much to his disappointment, the Continental Congress elected to give the ship to France in September 1782, to replace Magnifique which had run aground entering Boston harbor. Completing the ship, Jones turned it over to its new French officers. Foreign Service With the end of the war, Jones, like many Continental Navy officers, was discharged. Left idle, and feeling that he was not given enough credit for his actions during the war, Jones willingly accepted an offer to serve in the navy of Catherine the Great. Arriving in Russia in 1788, he served in that years campaign on the Black Sea under the name Pavel Dzhones. Though he fought well, he bickered with the other Russian officers and was soon politically outmaneuvered by them. Recalled to St. Petersburg, he was left without a command and soon departed for Paris. Returning to Paris in May 1790, he lived there in retirement, though he did make attempts to re-enter Russian service. He died alone on July 18, 1792. Buried in St. Louis Cemetery, Jones remains were returned to the United States in 1905. Carried aboard the armored cruiser USS Brooklyn, they were interred in an elaborate crypt within the United States Naval Academy Chapel at Annapolis, MD.

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Violent Video Games Should Not Be Banned - 1170 Words

Nicholas Colwell English IV Mr. Kula November 21, 2014 Violent Video Games Should Not be Banned Violent acts committed by children seem to occur on a monthly basis. What is to blame for this trend? Many people try to find, what they would believe to be, a likely source for the violence once. Some people turn to violent video games as the reason why violent acts occur amongst children. Some would even argue, that violent video games in general should be banned. Violent video games should not be banned because they do not cause violent behaviors, they’re a major industry, and not all gamers are children. It would appear to be only logical that violent video games cause violence. This has been refuted by multiple studies. According to the American Medical Association, â€Å"If video games do increase violent tendencies outside the laboratory, the explosion of gaming over the past decade from $3.2 billion in sales in 1995 to $7 billion in 2003, according to industry figures, would suggest a parallel trend in youth violence. Instead, youth violence has been decreasing. (Koffler) What this shows is that video games do not directly cause youth violence. Many people still try to use the excuse that video games cause short term aggression. Short term aggression does not equate to violence. If somebody constantly fails at a sport they get angry. The same concept applies with video games. When someone gets angry while they are playing a videogame they are often fine by the endShow MoreRelatedViolent Video Games Should Be Banned Essay1432 Words   |  6 Pagesof violent video game become more and more advanced. The effects of media violence on video games has been increasing in people’s daily life. It is still be an issue and have a lot of debate on whether or not violent video games should be banned. In this essay, violent video games can be defined by RWJF Blog Team as those video game which represent violence as the best or only way to resolve conflict.( Pioneering ideas 2010). This essay will discussed by two reasons for violent video gameRead MoreViolent Video Games Should Not Be Banned821 Words   |  4 PagesIntroduction From my opinion video games violent video games should not be banned. Today I will convince you why violent video games should not be banned. I will cover three points about risk factors, nature of the game and the studies claiming they have no link these all have things in common and they obviously will make you change your mind. First point Many Risk Factors are Associated with Youth Violence, but Video Games Have Nothing to do with it One of the main Surgeon generals has madeRead MoreViolent Video Games Should Be Banned1089 Words   |  5 Pages1. Topic and Stance: The topic that I’m researching and debating about is the concern of whether violent video games should be banned or not, and the stance that I’m taking is that they should be banned. 2. Background Information: There have been many concerns about violent video games and whether or not it’s the source of people’s violent behavior and the recent mass shootings. There have been many instances within the past decade where there have been mass shootings, such as the Aurora movie theaterRead MoreViolent Video Games Should Not Be Banned784 Words   |  3 Pagessubject, violent video games. Concerned parents influenced by the media have been trying for years to get all violent video games banned from the United States market. However, many scientists have proven that there is no correlation of violent games to violence, the media exaggerates isolated events and puts the blame for these events on violent games, and violent video games can actually have a positive effect on people of all ages. The media often suggests that violent video games have a consistentRead MoreBanning Violent Video Games On Children1545 Words   |  7 Pages Banning Violent Video Games A child is killing police officers. A teenager is hiring prostitutes to potentially kill them. He is using weapons such as guns, chainsaws, and knives to kill and commit horrible crimes. Thousands of children and teens participate in these actions daily. How? Violent Video games such as Doom, Call of Duty, and Grand Theft Auto are just a few of the games that are full of these awful actions. The Harvard Mental Health Letter states, â€Å"The Pew Research Center reportedRead MoreEssay on Violent Video Games are the Root Cause of Youth Aggression1157 Words   |  5 Pagesone of the most popular being video games. Video games have come a long way since they were first introduced to the mainstream audience during the 1960’s and 1970’s and have drawn a large amount attraction among people of all ages and culture. However it wasn’t until the Play-station was released that violence became a concern to parents and politics. The level of violence in video games h ave been in a matter of controversy dating all the way back to the classic games like Pacman and Space InvadersRead MoreShould Violent Media Be Banned Essay818 Words   |  4 PagesShould violent media be banned? Many teenagers are now being introduced into playing or watching violent media at very young ages and society are wondering if they should be concerned about it; they are wondering whether it can cause aggressive behaviour within the children/teenagers. Violent video games and violent action films normally have age restriction son them so that children under the age of 15 or in some cases 18 cannot buy them. You see many teenagers with these games and moviesRead MoreViolent Video Games857 Words   |  4 PagesShould Violent Video Games be Banned? â€Å"Learning is a deep human need, like mating and eating, and like all such needs it is meant to be deeply pleasurable to human beings.† ― James Paul Gee, Why Video Games Are Good for Your Soul: Pleasure and Learning. Some people have controversial argument that violent video games should be banned, claiming about the content of video games can change the behavior and attitudes of the players. Since the early 2000s, advocates of video games have emphasized theirRead MoreResearch Paper on Video Game Violence1483 Words   |  6 PagesKendal Hill Mrs. Van Fleet Block 3 10 December 2011 Video games and Violent Behavior True or False: Violent videogames cause children to become more aggressive. Sorry, that was a trick question. Despite much bandying of statistics and loud talking by critics on both sides of the argument, the real answer is that there is no real answer—at least not one that’s been proved scientifically (Zipp). Video games are an appealing target for a public figure in search of a crusade. Movies and musicRead MoreViolence Satire Essay541 Words   |  3 Pagespeople being violent, but when we are asked if we are violent or if we have ever responded with violence, everyone says they are not violent. But if among ourselves we are not violent then who is it that makes our society a violent society? Television plays a big role on violence. Most of us watch television daily. And what do we see daily on television? The news, about our world surrounded by violence? Movies, that only show shootings, death, and more violence? Even cartoons are violent, like the

What is the crisis in the British family a crisis about How is the crisis gendered Free Essays

The term ‘family’ officially evokes the image of a heterosexual, nuclear institution where each member is related to the other by marriage/law or blood, and the state, religion, media and other important institutions in our society encourage this image. However, lived realities are often very different and in recent years this form of the family, which is assumed to be normal and the norm, has been displaced by various other family forms which are labeled as deviant and which are assumed to be the root of current social problems. Hence has risen a ‘crisis’ in the British family. We will write a custom essay sample on What is the crisis in the British family a crisis about? How is the crisis gendered? or any similar topic only for you Order Now This crisis has been highlighted by the various social institutions mentioned above which encourage the heterosexual nuclear family form. Quoting Wright and Jagger, according to them ‘the turn of the century is marked by a growing crisis in the family, a crisis that may prove terminal unless decisive action is taken’, and the crisis has been pointed out as the collapse of marriage and the ‘family’. This crisis however is not new and a similar was said to have risen at the end of the 19th century. Like now, the crisis then too had been a rise in social problems and women had been identified as the cause. Single mothers, working mothers, woman opposing the dominant ideology of ‘womanhood’ were and are labeled as the cause of the ‘crisis’! As Gittins say, ‘Ideals of family relationships have become enshrined in our legal, social, religious and economic systems, which in turn reinforce the ideology and penalise or ostracise those who transgress it. ‘[Gittins 1992] The crisis in the family can thus be seen as nothing more than a gap between the ideological construction of the family and the diverse realities of family life. [Gittins,1993] The different alternate family forms that have come up and become increasingly common in the last few decades such as the single parent (specially single mother) family, extended families, communes, homosexual families are seen as social threats. This is because they resist the patriarchal ideology that is prevalent in the nuclear family form where the male is all-powerful. Resistance to this form of the family has seen the rise of the gendering of the family crisis with the blame falling on the women. This crisis as mentioned above is not something new and was seen before in the 1890’s when the results of it were deemed to be the evils of those times – namely illegitimate children, women not having children, prostitution, homosexuality etc. The family – which by the way was the white, middle class, heterosexist family – was seen to be the buffer against these social evils. In these families the sexual divisions of labor played an important part in the claiming of moral superiority. The industrial Revolution which preceded this period can this be seen as the time when the seeds of change were sown, because even though at this time the ‘domestic ideology’ of the middle class was established, working class women became increasingly involved in paid employment working away from home – and hence rose the first crisis. Indeed, the cause of the crisis at this time was seen to be the ‘bad’ mother – invariably a working class woman in paid labor. With World War II however, women had to take up jobs and it allowed them more freedom. Gradually the 20th century saw changes in attitudes and legislation – though it did take a very long time. The most important legislative changes were perhaps the right of divorce for women and the decriminalization of gay relationships. These factors were important in the rise in the alternate family forms. The argument that the heterosexual family is the ‘norm’ can however no longer be held valid. There is a vast discrepancy between the actual family forms and the ‘cereal-packet family’ considered the ideal! In 1961 over half of all households consisted of a married couple with dependent children and in 1992 this proportion had dropped to 24%. In 2001 19% all households consisted of an adult couple and dependent children – the couple not necessarily married. Marriage certainly has become less popular in the last 2 decades. Cohabitation, teen pregnancies, the number of children outside marriage has seen a marked increase. Homosexuality also has become much more widely accepted in society and many homosexual couples live with their children – adopted or from previous relationships. Divorce rates have also shot up dramatically with 1 in every 3 marriages ending in a divorce. These changes have been constructed into a national crisis by the state and the media. The statistics have been used to create moral panic among the people. In Britain, the government whether the New Right or the New Left have supported the ‘traditional family’. In the debates and policies of the New Right or the New Left, there is seen to be a particular connection between deviant family forms and social ills and there can be seen a particular vision of the individual, family and state responsibility. Policy units, the think tanks like the Social Affairs and the Economic Affairs units and the newspapers rather than the academic press stress are the agencies that stress more on the importance of the ‘traditional family values’. [Jagger and Wright, 1999] The lobbyists on behalf of the ‘ normal’ family say that government policies and feminist ideologies threaten it. Government policies however far from threatening the nuclear family form strongly support it. In fact the Conservatives called themselves the party of the ‘family’ and deviant family forms such as homosexual relationships and cohabitation were actively discouraged. The 1988 Local Government Act stated that it was an offence for local government employees or institutions to promote the acceptability of homosexuality as a family relationship. The Conservatives also shifted away from state provision and the emphasis lay on the family as a source of provision and rhetoric as well as legislation supported this. The moral panic shifted from the unemployed male scrounger to the female lone parent on benefit. The benefits given to single parents were cut down and the Child Support Act was introduced. Refamilisation – by which fathers were tried to be reinserted into the family by being made responsible for his child after separation made life very difficult for those people who had been divorced. This rhetoric of traditional family values however helped the state to back out of much of its fiscal responsibilities! The Labour Governments emphasis has also been on the family. Legislation based on the ‘families role in society’ has been passed. As Frazer says, there is ‘an insistent emphasis on ‘the family’ as the relevant and significant institution’ together with ‘the insistence that rights must be correlated with duties, obligations and responsibilities’. It does seem from the government’s emphasis on the family that the terrain of family offers the illusion of a cheap and feasible political program. Other than this emphasizing on family also obscures the failure of the politicians in other spheres such as economics or likewise. The media also plays an important role in this invocation of ‘the family’ – the ‘cereal-packet family’ being a noteworthy propaganda and the stress on the current ‘crisis’! Religion is another important social institution that encourages the nuclear family maintaining it to be moral and healthier that the other family forms. It has been seen that in all these cases of addressing this crisis by the state, the media or any other institution the focus has been on women as the cause of the crisis and consequently social problems. The single mother is seen as the source of current social evils like poverty, children’s indiscipline, crime and juvenile delinquency. Fatherless families are seen to be more of a problem with no one to impose authority and discipline! The discourse of lone/single motherhood as a social threat as it helps to resist close scrutiny of the content of hegemonic masculinity and fatherhood. [Lister, 1996] and conceals the fear that if men lose their relevance to the family life they also lose control over women and children. The traditional nuclear family, which is patriarchal, enforces this ideology through the strict gendered division of labor and other family forms without these gender divisions are not seen as desirable or normal. The traditional family is seen as one in which the male is the breadwinner and the woman is the homemaker – looking after the house and the children. This was in fact the Victorian middle class ideology. Though today women are no longer thought of as not going into paid work, it is still considered that her primary duty lies in looking after the home – thus she has a double burden of her job and housework. Men however have no such responsibilities and the symmetrical family that Young and Willmott talk about in which housework is shared equally between men and women instead of men thinking that they are doing a favour by helping, will take a long time to come if it ever does come at all! These family relationships – the inequality of women in their relationships with men ( in either marriage or cohabitation) is linked to wider social and economic factors and is infact sanctioned by the power of the state. Thus gendered division of labor is a part of the ‘normal’ family ideals. The crisis in the family means that this gender division no longer works within a majority of the families anymore. This is the feminist explanation for the rise of a ‘crisis’ in the family by the media and the state. The patriarchy that is based on the exploitation of women’s unpaid labor at home constructs alternate family forms as a ‘crisis’ and blames women as the cause of social problems, advocating the return to the ‘normal, heterosexual, nuclear family’ for a better and healthier society! How to cite What is the crisis in the British family a crisis about? How is the crisis gendered?, Essays

What is the crisis in the British family a crisis about How is the crisis gendered Free Essays

The term ‘family’ officially evokes the image of a heterosexual, nuclear institution where each member is related to the other by marriage/law or blood, and the state, religion, media and other important institutions in our society encourage this image. However, lived realities are often very different and in recent years this form of the family, which is assumed to be normal and the norm, has been displaced by various other family forms which are labeled as deviant and which are assumed to be the root of current social problems. Hence has risen a ‘crisis’ in the British family. We will write a custom essay sample on What is the crisis in the British family a crisis about? How is the crisis gendered? or any similar topic only for you Order Now This crisis has been highlighted by the various social institutions mentioned above which encourage the heterosexual nuclear family form. Quoting Wright and Jagger, according to them ‘the turn of the century is marked by a growing crisis in the family, a crisis that may prove terminal unless decisive action is taken’, and the crisis has been pointed out as the collapse of marriage and the ‘family’. This crisis however is not new and a similar was said to have risen at the end of the 19th century. Like now, the crisis then too had been a rise in social problems and women had been identified as the cause. Single mothers, working mothers, woman opposing the dominant ideology of ‘womanhood’ were and are labeled as the cause of the ‘crisis’! As Gittins say, ‘Ideals of family relationships have become enshrined in our legal, social, religious and economic systems, which in turn reinforce the ideology and penalise or ostracise those who transgress it. ‘[Gittins 1992] The crisis in the family can thus be seen as nothing more than a gap between the ideological construction of the family and the diverse realities of family life. [Gittins,1993] The different alternate family forms that have come up and become increasingly common in the last few decades such as the single parent (specially single mother) family, extended families, communes, homosexual families are seen as social threats. This is because they resist the patriarchal ideology that is prevalent in the nuclear family form where the male is all-powerful. Resistance to this form of the family has seen the rise of the gendering of the family crisis with the blame falling on the women. This crisis as mentioned above is not something new and was seen before in the 1890’s when the results of it were deemed to be the evils of those times – namely illegitimate children, women not having children, prostitution, homosexuality etc. The family – which by the way was the white, middle class, heterosexist family – was seen to be the buffer against these social evils. In these families the sexual divisions of labor played an important part in the claiming of moral superiority. The industrial Revolution which preceded this period can this be seen as the time when the seeds of change were sown, because even though at this time the ‘domestic ideology’ of the middle class was established, working class women became increasingly involved in paid employment working away from home – and hence rose the first crisis. Indeed, the cause of the crisis at this time was seen to be the ‘bad’ mother – invariably a working class woman in paid labor. With World War II however, women had to take up jobs and it allowed them more freedom. Gradually the 20th century saw changes in attitudes and legislation – though it did take a very long time. The most important legislative changes were perhaps the right of divorce for women and the decriminalization of gay relationships. These factors were important in the rise in the alternate family forms. The argument that the heterosexual family is the ‘norm’ can however no longer be held valid. There is a vast discrepancy between the actual family forms and the ‘cereal-packet family’ considered the ideal! In 1961 over half of all households consisted of a married couple with dependent children and in 1992 this proportion had dropped to 24%. In 2001 19% all households consisted of an adult couple and dependent children – the couple not necessarily married. Marriage certainly has become less popular in the last 2 decades. Cohabitation, teen pregnancies, the number of children outside marriage has seen a marked increase. Homosexuality also has become much more widely accepted in society and many homosexual couples live with their children – adopted or from previous relationships. Divorce rates have also shot up dramatically with 1 in every 3 marriages ending in a divorce. These changes have been constructed into a national crisis by the state and the media. The statistics have been used to create moral panic among the people. In Britain, the government whether the New Right or the New Left have supported the ‘traditional family’. In the debates and policies of the New Right or the New Left, there is seen to be a particular connection between deviant family forms and social ills and there can be seen a particular vision of the individual, family and state responsibility. Policy units, the think tanks like the Social Affairs and the Economic Affairs units and the newspapers rather than the academic press stress are the agencies that stress more on the importance of the ‘traditional family values’. [Jagger and Wright, 1999] The lobbyists on behalf of the ‘ normal’ family say that government policies and feminist ideologies threaten it. Government policies however far from threatening the nuclear family form strongly support it. In fact the Conservatives called themselves the party of the ‘family’ and deviant family forms such as homosexual relationships and cohabitation were actively discouraged. The 1988 Local Government Act stated that it was an offence for local government employees or institutions to promote the acceptability of homosexuality as a family relationship. The Conservatives also shifted away from state provision and the emphasis lay on the family as a source of provision and rhetoric as well as legislation supported this. The moral panic shifted from the unemployed male scrounger to the female lone parent on benefit. The benefits given to single parents were cut down and the Child Support Act was introduced. Refamilisation – by which fathers were tried to be reinserted into the family by being made responsible for his child after separation made life very difficult for those people who had been divorced. This rhetoric of traditional family values however helped the state to back out of much of its fiscal responsibilities! The Labour Governments emphasis has also been on the family. Legislation based on the ‘families role in society’ has been passed. As Frazer says, there is ‘an insistent emphasis on ‘the family’ as the relevant and significant institution’ together with ‘the insistence that rights must be correlated with duties, obligations and responsibilities’. It does seem from the government’s emphasis on the family that the terrain of family offers the illusion of a cheap and feasible political program. Other than this emphasizing on family also obscures the failure of the politicians in other spheres such as economics or likewise. The media also plays an important role in this invocation of ‘the family’ – the ‘cereal-packet family’ being a noteworthy propaganda and the stress on the current ‘crisis’! Religion is another important social institution that encourages the nuclear family maintaining it to be moral and healthier that the other family forms. It has been seen that in all these cases of addressing this crisis by the state, the media or any other institution the focus has been on women as the cause of the crisis and consequently social problems. The single mother is seen as the source of current social evils like poverty, children’s indiscipline, crime and juvenile delinquency. Fatherless families are seen to be more of a problem with no one to impose authority and discipline! The discourse of lone/single motherhood as a social threat as it helps to resist close scrutiny of the content of hegemonic masculinity and fatherhood. [Lister, 1996] and conceals the fear that if men lose their relevance to the family life they also lose control over women and children. The traditional nuclear family, which is patriarchal, enforces this ideology through the strict gendered division of labor and other family forms without these gender divisions are not seen as desirable or normal. The traditional family is seen as one in which the male is the breadwinner and the woman is the homemaker – looking after the house and the children. This was in fact the Victorian middle class ideology. Though today women are no longer thought of as not going into paid work, it is still considered that her primary duty lies in looking after the home – thus she has a double burden of her job and housework. Men however have no such responsibilities and the symmetrical family that Young and Willmott talk about in which housework is shared equally between men and women instead of men thinking that they are doing a favour by helping, will take a long time to come if it ever does come at all! These family relationships – the inequality of women in their relationships with men ( in either marriage or cohabitation) is linked to wider social and economic factors and is infact sanctioned by the power of the state. Thus gendered division of labor is a part of the ‘normal’ family ideals. The crisis in the family means that this gender division no longer works within a majority of the families anymore. This is the feminist explanation for the rise of a ‘crisis’ in the family by the media and the state. The patriarchy that is based on the exploitation of women’s unpaid labor at home constructs alternate family forms as a ‘crisis’ and blames women as the cause of social problems, advocating the return to the ‘normal, heterosexual, nuclear family’ for a better and healthier society! How to cite What is the crisis in the British family a crisis about? How is the crisis gendered?, Essays

How media effect our life free essay sample

How media effect our life BY equivalents In todays society, media comes into our lives in many different forms and throughout the years, these forms have affected our society positively. There are basically three types of media, print media, electronic media and new age media. Print media Includes newspapers, books, and pamphlets, electronic media Includes television and radio, and the new age media includes phones and internet. These types of media interact with people everyday and in our lives, and are the main source that affect us and change our society. Newspaper is a traditional kind of media which has been used for a few centuries. Newspaper Is a periodical publication which Includes news regarding current events, various articles, societal discussion and some advertisement. Radio is also a popular way for people to know news or other Information. Radio and newspaper are two similar kind of media, however, one is printed while the other is broadcasted. With newspaper and radio developing. Our daily has changed a lot. Newspaper or radio can influence us on what we think about some facts, news or organization. It can play very vital role in building the way that people think and convincing what people should do. Newspaper is main resource of daily information offer people up-to-date news. Newspaper have positive effect as well as negative effect. Its a mirror of truth which people is willing to believe. Its a media for both educated and uneducated people. Some people can also find their job though newspapers. Advertisement is also a outstanding use of newspaper. Some organizations and companies will put their advertisements on newspapers to sell or to show their products. However, there are also negative effects of newspaper. In some newspaper, blast might be exist. For example, In World War II newspaper played a significant role. During WI As the most worldwide kind of mass media, TV plays an important role In modern society. To some extent, TV is the combination of newspaper and radio, because TV Includes sounds, images and sentences. It Is a new stage of media which can show audience daily news much more directly and vivid. People prefer to watch TV rather than read a newspaper because colorful and brilliant TV program Is more Interesting than a newspaper. Therefore TV has become a popular media for people getting sews and having some fun. Television Is the most functional media during these years. People use it to spread information, and updated news. In the early years, there were early a few news channel since It created. But the channel become diversity than it used to be recently. Despite of news, advertisement is another newly media to recommend the product. -its much more faintly than the customer walk Into the mall and choose their favorite product. In Dalton, television can offer different age-stage of various people and satisfied their requirement. The TV company may arrange different special channel. Such like sports channels. Most of the live sports game are showed and the latest sport news as well. Businessmen may use the Economic channel to receive the business news. Internet is the most widely use media of the world. Various usage of internet are being used by people all over the world, For most people. To spend some time on 1 OFF interest in. There are all kind of message on the internet. Whatever you want to look for you can find it. Even if some specific information, you can find it in a very short time by search on the internet. In the old day, we have to look though a article word y word to find something that we are looking for. With internet we can Just type what we are looking for and answer will come out automatically in one second. Our life have become different since the internet has been invented. Nowadays people will see the news and look for any information on the internet instead of newspaper and television. We can see many comments for events on the internet which cannot be seen in other two media. This is good because people can talk about their opinion about some events after they read them instead of Just read the news. Internet is extremely necessary in our society. Internet is like a rope that connects the world. It makes communication become easier around the world. We can communicate instantly though the internet by email or some chatting applications instead of sending a letter and waste a few days. Internet is a media that can carry message really fast. For example, if somewhere in the world is having a natural disaster, once this news get onto the internet ,people from all over the world will know immediately. Media have changed our life and society a lot no matter what form it is. Media do help human beings a lot. As the most ancient way of spreading information, swapper and radio spread the news immediately and let people know the world deeply. However, people always accept the news as the truth, and accept the bias unconsciously. TV is the revolution of mass media, and replaces the old way little by little. As the most popular way to receive the information, the Internet provides a more convenience way to know the world instead of traveling the world. However, people depend on the mass media too much, and regard everything they knew from the mass media as the truth. If mass media are controlled for a personal goal, how people can distinguish the truth and the lies?